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Posts Tagged ‘cellphones’

Hmm, the screenshot of the @sprint twitter account is not showing in the quote, but that is basically the source.  hat tip to Android Central.

I was actually in the process of loading a custom rom to my phone when this came out.  I might hold off.  I still kinda want to try the ext4 format, but on the other hand I’m really not experiencing a whole lot of screen-lag either.  hmmm.

 

With news that the Samsung Vibrant may start seeing Froyo roll out as early as Jan. 21, all eyes are on the other major U.S. carriers and their news or lack of about the Froyo update for the rest of the US Galaxy S line of phones.  Sprint has come forward via Twitter and let everyone know they are still working closely with Samsung and will release Froyo for the Epic 4G once it meets the “rigorous testing criteria” it has for the popular handset.

via Froyo for the Epic 4G coming ASAP | Android Central.

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As an owner of a Samsung Galaxy S (Epic on Sprint), I’ve been waiting for the Froyo update.   I’m still waiting, long past the promised date of “end of 2010.”

An unconfirmed post was placed the xda-developer’s forum, and has hit all the gadget websites in the past few days.  It’s unconfirmed, but not flatly denied, at least not yet.

Samsung will need to do some PR repair soon.  I can hack my epic, but I’m seriously reconsidering recommending it or any Samsung to anyone else, particularly those who aren’t tech-savvy enough to custom load it themselves.

In the past, most phone updates would mainly consist of critical and maintenance updates. Carriers almost never want to incur the cost of a feature update because it is of little benefit to them, adds little to the device, and involves a lot of testing on the carrier end. Android has changed the playing field, however – since the Android Open Source Project is constantly being updated, and that information being made widely available to the public, there is pressure for the phone to be constantly updated with the latest version of Android. With most manufacturers, such as HTC, Motorola, etc. This is fine and considered a maintenance upgrade. Samsung, however, considers it a feature update, and requires carriers to pay a per device update fee for each incremental Android update.

via The Samsung Secret – Why U.S. Galaxy S Phones run Android 2.1 Still – xda-developers.

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The evidence has been mounting for some time, and people are starting to notice.  TechCrunch recently posted about the problems with AT&T, and the article is also a good collection of references:

Since I switched to AT&T from Verizon just over 2 years ago to get the iPhone (which, of course, AT&T has exclusively in the U.S.), there have been no shortage of shortcomings by AT&T. But as of late, I’ve been noticing things getting much, much worse. And I’m hardly the only one. And so it’s time to call out AT&T on those failures. And plead with Apple not to renew its exclusive contract with AT&T when it expires next year.

via AT&T Is A Big, Steaming Heap Of Failure.

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Basically, you setup an SSH tunnel to the Pre, which supports running as a SOCKS proxy. You then configure your browser to point to this proxy and BAM, you’re tethering away.

via Palm Pre – How to Guide to Enable Tethering!.

There it is, the step by step guide.  No Fear.

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